Jan 21, 2021  
2014-15 Catalog 
    
2014-15 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

 

 

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CS 346 - Computer Forensics


    4 credits
    Surveys the technologies, techniques, and responsibilities of a criminal or civil investigation involving computers, networks, Internet service providers, and electronic evidence. Explores the ways a computer or a computer network can be associated with a crime. Examines rules of evidence and proof. Emphasizes maintaining an evidentiary trail through computer data and network activity. Reviews the responsibilities of the computer forensics investigator, the fragility of computer evidence, and the techniques used to protect evidence. Approved for University Studies (Integration - Strand H). Prerequisite(s): Completion of all lower division University Studies requirements (Cross-listed with CCJ 346 .)
  
  •  

    CS 352 - Programming Languages


    4 credits
    Formal definition of programming languages, including specification of syntax and semantics. Simple statements, including precedence, infix, prefix, and postfix notification. global properties of algorithmic languages, including scope of declarations, storage allocations, grouping of statements, binding time of constituents, subroutines, co-routines, and tasks, concurrency and exception handling, variables and data types. Prerequisite(s): CS 258  .
  
  •  

    CS 356 - Programming Topics


    2 to 4 credits
    Explores programming in different languages. Topics are based on interest and need. Offerings may include web programming and C++. Repeat credit is allowed for different topics. Prerequisites and credits determined by topic. Prerequisite(s): CS 257 
  
  •  

    CS 360 - Databases


    4 credits
    Introduces the concepts necessary for designing and implementing database systems. Emphasizes data modeling, normalization, and SQL. Prerequisite(s): CS 257 .
  
  •  

    CS 367 - C and UNIX


    4 credits
    Explores concepts of the UNIX operating system and the C programming language. Students learn how to use UNIX and how to program in C on UNIX. Prerequisite(s): CS 257  completed with a B or better.
  
  •  

    CS 380 - .Net Development


    4 credits
    Surveys the Visual Basic.net language and the Visual Studio.net programming environment. Topics include concepts of object-oriented programming, database basics and interactions, GUI development, web applications, creating and installing dynamic link libraries, and stand-alone programs. Prerequisite(s): CS 257 .
  
  •  

    CS 399 - Special Studies


    1 to 18 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 401 - Research


    1 to 6 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 403 - Thesis


    1 to 9 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 405 - Reading and Conference


    1 to 6 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 407 - Seminar


    1 to 4 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 409 - Practicum


    1 to 15 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
  
  •  

    CS 411 - Data Structures


    4 credits
    Develops data structures, with an emphasis on algorithms, characteristics, and applications. Examines alternative algorithms for manipulating data structures and their complexity. Applications include data management systems, file organization, information retrieval, and list processing. Prerequisite(s): CS 258  and CS 367 .
  
  •  

    CS 415 - Foundations of Emerging Computer Applications


    4 credits
    Covers the background needed for students to make contributions in an emerging application area. Topics may include digital signal processing, data mining, and security. Focuses specifically on those foundational concepts that students need to be able to create or enhance digital solutions. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite(s): CS 257  and MTH 243  (Some topics may require additional prerequisites)
  
  •  

    CS 418 - Theory of Computation


    4 credits
    Covers formal language and automata theory from finite state automata to Turing machines. Presents the Chomsky hierarchy of languages and the relationship between languages and automata. Prerequisite(s): CS 257  .
  
  •  

    CS 426 - UNIX System Administration


    4 credits
    Introduces UNIX and shell programming, start-up and shut down, user administration, file systems, controlling processes, adding disks and cron, configuring the kernel, SLIP, PPP, and security. Prerequisite(s): CS 336  and CS 367 
  
  •  

    CS 432 - Client-Server


    4 credits
    Studies application design from a distributed processing perspective. Focuses on server-side programming using CGI scripts and application objects. Examines the issues involved in migrating traditional client-server applications to the Internet. Prerequisite(s): CS 336  and CS 360 
  
  •  

    CS 433 - Corporate Web Development


    4 credits
    Introduces XML, XSL, and XQL. Examines e-commerce, digital money, and data encryption. Students are required to work on an e-commerce project as part of the course. Prerequisite(s): CS 257  and CS 295 
  
  •  

    CS 436 - Networks II


    4 credits
    Continues Networks I. Offers an in-depth study of network administration. Topics may include Internet access, distributed programming methods, routing, congestion control, security, RPC, name resolution, message-based distributed applications, and Internet architectures. Prerequisite(s): CS 336 . Corequisite(s): CS 436L .
  
  •  

    CS 436L - Networks II


    0 credits
    Corresponding lab for CS 436 .
  
  •  

    CS 446 - Wireless Networks


    4 credits
    Examines the world of wireless communication. Starting with the fundamentals of the generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves, it surveys information transmission techniques such as spread spectrum and phase shift keying, wireless LANs, personal networks, and cellular and satellite systems. Prerequisite(s): CS 336 .
  
  •  

    CS 450 - Compilers


    4 credits
    Introduces compiler construction. Students create a compiler for a mini-language. Topics include grammars, lexical analysis, parsers, parser generators, code generation, and code optimization. Prerequisite(s): CS 314 , CS 367 , and CS 411 
  
  •  

    CS 455 - Topics in Computer Science


    2 to 4 credits
    Explores selected topics in computer science. Topics are offered based on interest and need. Repeat credit is allowed for varying topics. Prerequisites and credits are determined by topic. Prerequisite(s): CS 257 .
  
  •  

    CS 456 - Security I


    4 credits
    Introduces the many facets of computer security and information assurance. Explores the security organization and infrastructure within an organization along with policies, standards, and procedures. Covers cryptographic protocols, modes, and algorithms, including DES, AES, RSA, and Kerberos. Prerequisite(s): CS 336 .
  
  •  

    CS 457 - Security II


    4 credits
    Covers techniques and principles of design and configuration of secure workstations, servers, and LANs. Presents system and LAN intrusion detection and data assurance monitoring. Discusses the basics of virtual private networks and perimeter protection, as well as systems and tools used for implementation. Prerequisite(s): CS 456 .
  
  •  

    CS 458 - Security III


    4 credits
    Studies the threats to computer systems connected to the Internet. Examines how crackers find a system and its vulnerabilities then use those vulnerabilities to compromise the system, including the use of viruses. Looks at various tools used to attack and defend systems, as well as resources to detect and analyze intrusions. Address both wired and wireless systems security. Prerequisite(s): CS 457 .
  
  •  

    CS 459 - Operating Systems


    4 credits
    Explores operating systems and components, operating characteristics, user services, and limitations. Covers implementation techniques for processing input-output and interrupt handling; overall structure of multiprogramming systems or multiprocessor configurations; and details of addressing techniques, core management, file system design and management, system accounting, and other user-related services. Prerequisite(s): CS 411 .
  
  •  

    CS 460 - Advanced Databases


    4 credits
    Introduces integrity constraints and triggers, stored procedures, indexing and index structures, transactions, concurrency, locking, and web databases. Students usually work on a major project during the term. Prerequisite(s): CS 360 .
  
  •  

    CS 462 - Database Administration


    4 credits
    Examines the tasks involved in administering a large and complex database management system (DBMS). Teaches hands-on techniques for installing, setting up, and maintaining a production database. Students use a popular DBMS (e.g., Oracle) to understand the concepts of managing structures, logs, data files, and users. Also prepares students to take the appropriate database administration (DBA) certification exams. Prerequisite(s): CS 360 .
  
  •  

    CS 467 - Secure Programming Practices


    4 credits
    Explores software system threats, vulnerabilities, and controls from the programming perspective. Topics include threat-vulnerability analysis, buffer overflows, access control, race conditions, and input validation. Prerequisite(s): CS 258  and CS 360 
  
  •  

    CS 469 - Systems Analysis


    4 credits
    Covers object-oriented software system analysis techniques using Unified Modeling Language (UML). Explores software development methodologies, project planning and management, requirements analysis, and testing. Topics include use cases, conceptual data models, the analysis class model, and alternative design strategies. Prerequisite(s):  CS 360 , CS 411  and senior standing.
  
  •  

    CS 470 - Capstone Project I


    4 credits
    Provides a problem for students to analyze and solve through the design of a solution, the creation and implementation of a software solution, and documentation of the entire process. Prerequisite(s): CS 469 .
  
  •  

    CS 471 - Capstone Project II


    4 credits
    The Capstone II goal is for students to finish the work started in Capstone I by creating and implementing the software solution and completing the documentation. The documentation should address project maintenance and the operating procedures required to run the students’ software. Prerequisite(s): CS 470 .
  
  •  

    CS 501 - Research


    1 to 6 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 503 - Thesis


    1 to 9 credits
    Credits to be arranged.  Repeatable
  
  •  

    CS 505 - Reading and Conference


    1 to 6 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable. 
  
  •  

    CS 507 - Seminar


    1 to 4 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 509 - Practicum


    1 to 15 credits
    Credits to be arranged.  Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
  
  •  

    CS 511 - Data Structures


    4 credits
    Develops data structures, with an emphasis on algorithms, characteristics, and applications. Examines alternative algorithms for manipulating data structures and their complexity. Applications include data management systems, file organization, information retrieval, and list processing. Prerequisite(s): CS 258 
  
  •  

    CS 515 - Foundations of Emerging Computer Applications


    4 credits
    Covers the background needed for students to make contributions in an emerging application area. Topics may include digital signal processing, data mining, and security. Focuses specifically on those foundational concepts that students need to be able to create or enhance digital solutions. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite(s): CS 257  and MTH 243  (Some topics may require additional prerequisites)
  
  •  

    CS 518 - Theory of Computation


    4 credits
    Covers formal language and automata theory from finite state automata to Turing machines. Presents the Chomsky hierarchy of languages and the relationship between languages and automata. Prerequisite(s): CS 411 .
  
  •  

    CS 526 - UNIX System Administration


    4 credits
    Introduces UNIX and shell programming, start-up and shut down, user administration, file systems, controlling processes, adding disks and cron, configuring the kernel, SLIP, PPP, and security. Prerequisite(s): CS 336  and CS 367 
  
  •  

    CS 532 - Client-Server


    4 credits
    Studies application design from a distributed processing perspective. Focuses on server-side programming using CGI scripts and application objects. Examines the issues involved in migrating traditional client-server applications to the Internet. Prerequisite(s): CS 336  and CS 360 
  
  •  

    CS 533 - Corporate Web Development


    4 credits
    Introduces XML, XSL, and XQL. Examines e-commerce, digital money, and data encryption. Students are required to work on an e-commerce project as part of the course. Prerequisite(s): CS 257  and CS 295 .
  
  •  

    CS 536 - Networks II


    4 credits
    Continues Networks I. Offers an in-depth study of network administration. Topics may include Internet access, distributed programming methods, routing, congestion control, security, RPC, name resolution, message-based distributed applications, and Internet architectures. Prerequisite(s): CS 336 . Corequisite(s): CS 536L .
  
  •  

    CS 536L - Networks II


    0 credits
    Corresponding lab for CS 536 .
  
  •  

    CS 546 - Wireless Networks


    4 credits
    Examines the world of wireless communication. Starting with the fundamentals of the generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves, it surveys information transmission techniques such as spread spectrum and phase shift keying, wireless LANs, personal networks, and cellular and satellite systems. Prerequisite(s): CS 336 .
  
  •  

    CS 550 - Compilers


    4 credits
    Introduces compiler construction. Students create a compiler for a mini-language. Topics include grammars, lexical analysis, parsers, parser generators, code generation, and code optimization. Prerequisite(s): CS 314 , CS 367 , and CS 411 
  
  •  

    CS 555 - Topics in Computer Science


    2 to 4 credits
    Explores selected topics in computer science. Topics are offered based on interest and need. Repeat credit is allowed for varying topics. Prerequisites and credits are determined by topic. Prerequisite(s): CS 257 .
  
  •  

    CS 556 - Security I


    4 credits
    Introduces the many facets of computer security and information assurance. Explores the security organization and infrastructure within an organization along with policies, standards, and procedures. Covers cryptographic protocols, modes, and algorithms, including DES, AES, RSA, and Kerberos. Prerequisite(s): CS 336 .
  
  •  

    CS 557 - Security II


    4 credits
    Covers techniques and principles of design and configuration of secure workstations, servers, and LANs. Presents system and LAN intrusion detection and data assurance monitoring. Discusses the basics of virtual private networks and perimeter protection, as well as systems and tools used for implementation. Prerequisite(s): CS 456 .
  
  •  

    CS 558 - Security III


    4 credits
    Studies the threats to computer systems connected to the Internet. Examines how crackers find a system and its vulnerabilities then use those vulnerabilities to compromise the system, including the use of viruses. Looks at various tools used to attack and defend systems, as well as resources to detect and analyze intrusions. Address both wired and wireless systems security. Prerequisite(s): CS 457 .
  
  •  

    CS 559 - Operating Systems


    4 credits
    Explores operating systems and components, operating characteristics, user services, and limitations. Covers implementation techniques for processing input-output and interrupt handling; overall structure of multiprogramming systems or multiprocessor configurations; and details of addressing techniques, core management, file system design and management, system accounting, and other user-related services. Prerequisite(s): CS 411 
  
  •  

    CS 560 - Advanced Databases


    4 credits
    Introduces integrity constraints and triggers, stored procedures, indexing and index structures, transactions, concurrency, locking, and web databases. Students usually work on a major project during the term. Prerequisite(s): CS 360 .
  
  •  

    CS 562 - Database Administration


    4 credits
    Examines the tasks involved in administering a large and complex database management system (DBMS). Teaches hands-on techniques for installing, setting up, and maintaining a production database. Students use a popular DBMS (e.g., Oracle) to understand the concepts of managing structures, logs, data files, and users. Also prepares students to take the appropriate database administration (DBA) certification exams. Prerequisite(s): CS 360 .
  
  •  

    CS 567 - Secure Programming Practices


    4 credits
    Explores software system threats, vulnerabilities, and controls from the programming perspective. Topics include threat-vulnerability analysis, buffer overflows, access control, race conditions, and input validation. Prerequisite(s): CS 258  and CS 360 
  
  •  

    CS 569 - Systems Analysis


    4 credits
    Covers object-oriented software system analysis techniques using Unified Modeling Language (UML). Explores software development methodologies, project planning and management, requirements analysis, and testing. Topics include use cases, conceptual data models, the analysis class model, and alternative design strategies. Prerequisite(s): CS 360 , CS 411  and graduate standing.
  
  •  

    CS 581 - Topics in the Foundations of Computer Science


    4 credits
    Covers selected topics in the foundations of computer science. Sample topics include analysis of algorithms, computational models, and programming languages. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 582 - Topics in Information Systems


    4 credits
    Explores selected topics in information systems. Sample topics include database systems, networking and the Internet, and creating business frameworks. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CS 583 - Topics in Software Engineering


    4 credits
    Covers selected topics in software engineering. Sample topics include metrics, design methodologies, and quality assurance. Repeatable.

Counseling

Mental Health Counseling

  
  •  

    COUN 502 - The Helping Relationship


    4 credits
    Designed for first-term mental health counseling students. Focuses on the foundational ingredients of the effective helping relationship, including development of a clear professional identity; ethical practice; multicultural sensitivity; and the conceptual, interpersonal, and therapeutic skills that foster movement toward clients’ goals and potentialities. Students gain competence in interviewing and counseling microskills. The pre-practicum portion involves practice interviews utilizing videotape critique in weekly dyads/triads and group supervision. Students learn how to utilize supervision to facilitate developments of microskills and expand competence as an “intentional” counselor. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program. Corequisite(s): COUN 571 .
  
  •  

    COUN 504 - Individual Counseling Practicum


    4 credits
    Provides supervised training and experience in individual counseling. Designed to build upon the understanding of the counseling theories studied in COUN 571   and the counseling microskills learned in COUN 502 . MHC students engage in videotaped practice counseling with undergraduate student volunteers. Videotapes are utilized in weekly dyad/triad and group supervision sessions. Prerequisite(s): COUN 502 , COUN 571 , and enrollment in the MHC program
  
  •  

    COUN 506 - Group Counseling Practicum


    4 credits
    Provides supervised group counseling training and experience for MHC students. Co-leaders plan and facilitate an eight-week personal growth group for undergraduate student volunteers. Videotapes are utilized in weekly dyad/triad and group supervision sessions. Prerequisite(s): COUN 502 ,COUN 504 , COUN 571 , and enrollment in the MHC program. Corequisite(s): COUN 574 
  
  •  

    COUN 507 - Seminar: Special Topics


    1 to 4 credits
    Offers focused study in counseling or related fields relevant to counseling. Repeatable for a maximum of 16 credits. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.
  
  •  

    COUN 510 - Internship


    1 to 8 credits
    Offers a supervised counseling experience at selected agencies and organizations. Students provide counseling services to agency clients and function as part of the agency counseling personnel. Sessions are reviewed in both individual and group supervision. Documentation, on-site supervision and evaluation, and weekly meetings with the SOU supervisor required. Graded P/NP. MHC students are required to take at least 9 credits of supervised internship during their program. May not be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite(s): COUN 571 , COUN 574  , and enrollment in the MHC program
  
  •  

    COUN 521 - Assessment


    4 credits
    Surveys the common assessment methods and instruments used in counseling children, adolescents, adults, elders, couples, and families. Addresses assessment requirements of managed care and methods of assessing counseling effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 525 - Substance Abuse and Co-Occurring Disorders


    3 credits
    Acquaints students with the concepts of chemical dependence and co-occurring disorders (dual diagnoses). Explores the developmental models of addiction and the theories and etiology of addictions, as well as strategies for prevention and intervention. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 531 - Community Counseling


    4 credits
    Examines the effects of social and environmental factors on behavior, with emphasis on the impact of societal systems (schools, neighborhoods, organizations, and other networks) on individuals and their mental health. Sample topics include community action, public policy, prevention programming, and social change processes. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 542 - Applied Research


    4 credits
    Emphasizes the design of applied research and outcome evaluation in counseling settings. Reviews relevant experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs, with additional training in qualitative methods. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate research methods and statistics course and enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 549 - Career Counseling


    4 credits
    Introduces the psychology of career-life planning and occupational choices. Follows guidelines from CACREP for counselor preparation and is a core course in the MHC program. Examines career development theories and decision-making models; lifespan career development; career, educational, and labor market information systems and resources; program planning and evaluation; assessment; and career counseling approaches, techniques, and ethical considerations. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 570 - Advanced Human Growth and Development


    4 credits
    Examines theory and research related to human development from birth to death. Emphasizes the application of developmental theories to the counseling process. Addresses individual differences in physical and physiological development. Evaluates the influence of perception, cognition, learning, personality, and social factors on behavior throughout the human lifespan. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate coursework in lifespan development or developmental psychology.
  
  •  

    COUN 571 - Counseling Theory


    4 credits
    Explores the roles and functions of the professional counselor relative to other mental health professionals. Develops the core ingredients of effective counseling practice, including interpersonal, conceptual, and helping skills that foster movement toward a client’s goals. Addresses the personal qualities of effective counselors, the creation of therapeutic alliances, counseling microskills, ethical practice, and techniques fundamental to contemporary theoretical orientations. Surveys the primary models of counseling and psychotherapy from theoretical, experiential, and personal growth perspectives. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate coursework in abnormal psychology.
  
  •  

    COUN 572 - Mental Health Counselor: Identity and Practice


    2 credits
    Provides a foundation of the mental health counseling profession’s history, unique contributions to the human service provider field, identity themes, distinctive practice characteristics, and an interdisciplinary approach to interventions. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 573 - Mental Health Profession


    4 credits
    Refines counseling skills and continues development of professional portfolios. Students write a professional disclosure statement, conduct a seminar on their theoretical framework, determine the setting and clients best-suited for their theoretical approach, and address other issues germane to the professional counselor and human service professional. Prerequisite(s): COUN 571  and enrollment in the MHC program
  
  •  

    COUN 574 - Group Counseling


    4 credits
    Offers a theoretical and experiential introduction to group counseling. Emphasizes leadership styles and skills; stages of counseling groups; ethics; specific modalities; and major orientations to group counseling and their applications, evaluations, and effectiveness. Students plan and co-lead a counseling group with student volunteers as part of a laboratory experience and participate in supervision groups. Students also participate in an experiential group separate from the class. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 575 - Advanced Crisis Intervention Strategies


    4 credits
    Applies intervention strategies to specific crisis situations and critical incidents. Studies the driving forces behind the event, assessment procedures, and intervention strategies applied during and after the trauma incident. Crisis categories include suicide, battered women’s syndrome, sexual assault, post-traumatic stress disorder, personal loss, and substance abuse. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 576 - Family and Couples Counseling


    4 credits
    Explores the theoretical and practical applications of family-systems approaches to the treatment of dysfunctional families and couples. Presents family lifecycle issues, the role of the therapist, and alternatives to intervention. Prerequisite(s): COUN 571  and enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 577 - Counseling Children


    4 credits
    Surveys methods, other than behavior modification, of counseling children. Includes forms of play therapy, expressive therapy, role-playing, stress management for children, and experiential methods that aid in the assessment of children’s problems.
  
  •  

    COUN 581 - Ethics and Roles in the Counseling Profession


    4 credits
     

    Examines the ethical standards of the American Counseling Association, the American Mental Health Counseling Association, and other relevant professional organizations. Focuses on legal and ethical issues related to professional practice in counseling and human service fields. Emphasizes issues of public policy and sociocultural factors affecting counseling. Challenges participants to apply critical-thinking skills to ethical decision making in their respective professional roles. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.

  
  •  

    COUN 583 - Advanced Psychopathology


    4 credits
    Explores the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of mental illness as defined by the DSM-IV. Covers treatment planning, with special emphasis on psychopharmacology. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate course in abnormal psychology and enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 584 - Psychopharmacology


    2 credits
    Provides a basic overview and understanding of how medications are used in the treatment of psychological and behavioral disorders. Various DSM diagnoses provide a framework for learning about treatment choices that include psychiatric medications. Focuses on the integration of psychotropic medications and counseling. Topics include drug interactions, medication side effects, consultation with medical personnel, and characteristics of psychiatric medications.
  
  •  

    COUN 585 - Treatment Planning and Consultation


    3 credits
    Focuses on general principles and practices of diagnosis, treatment planning, consultation and referral of mental and emotional disorders, and dysfunctional behavior, including addictive behaviors. Examines the etiology of mental and emotional disorders/dysfunctions and addictive behaviors. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 586 - Multicultural Mental Health


    4 credits
    Surveys the mental health status of racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Presents culture-specific models for providing assessment, diagnosis, and treatment services for individuals, including children, adolescents, adults, families, groups, and communities. Examines ethical issues and training for service providers. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.
  
  •  

    COUN 599 - Professional Guidance


    1 to 4 credits
    MHC students work closely with a faculty advisor in seminar and individual meetings to begin their professional portfolios and identify their strengths, challenges, and areas of interest. This process includes determining the setting and clients best-suited to the student, identifying appropriate theoretical orientations, and continuing the discussion of ethical concerns and professional identity. May not be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MHC program.

Creative Writing

 Upper Division Courses

Note: ENG 298 is a prerequisite to most upper division writing classes. WR 280 and CW 281-282 are additional prerequisites for upper division rhetoric, fiction writing, and poetry writing courses. In order to be admitted into 300-level Creative Writing workshops (WR 380 and CW 381-382), in addition to existing prerequisites, students must achieve a grade of B- or higher in WR 280 and CW 281-282.

  
  •  

    CW 199 - Special Studies


    1 to 18 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CW 220 - Imaginative Writing: Working (and Playing) with Words


    4 credits
    Students explore creative writing strategies that reflect the language of today’s world, from advertising and tweets to blogs and songs. The text for the class is all around us: on walls and phones and computers and television, even in the ways we talk to each other. Students produce portfolios and professional resumes of work (and play).
  
  •  

    CW 281 - Introductory Fiction Writing


    4 credits
    Acquaints students with principles of fiction writing through imaginative exercises, class discussions, and reading. Students portray characters in scenes and situations that offer insight into the human condition and develop their sense of what an audience gleans from their work.
  
  •  

    CW 282 - Introductory Poetry Writing


    4 credits
    Acquaints students with principles of verse composition and key topics in contemporary poetics. Areas of emphasis include verse forms, sound play, and procedural methods (e.g., chance operations, memory work, recombination, erasure).
  
  •  

    CW 299 - Special Studies


    1 to 18 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CW 320 - Contemporary Literary Culture


    4 credits
    Students read and respond to a selection of contemporary print and digital literary journals, explore past and present models of small press publication and literary community, and accelerate their own engagement in writing-based networks on the local level and beyond. Prerequisite(s):  WR 280  , CW 281  , CW 282  .
  
  •  

    CW 381 - Intermediate Fiction Writing


    4 credits
    For students interested in writing the short story, novella, or novel. Includes analysis and discussion of student work. Grade of B- or higher in all three lower-division courses WR 280, CW 281, and CW 282 required for admission. Prerequisite(s): ENG 298 WR 280 , CW 281  and CW 282 .
  
  •  

    CW 382 - Intermediate Poetry Writing


    4 credits
    Students compose poems, discuss other students’ work, and respond to assigned readings in poetry and poetics. Grade of B- or higher in all three lower-division courses WR 280, CW 281, and CW 282 required for admission. Prerequisite(s): ENG 298  , WR 280 , CW 281  and CW 282 .
  
  •  

    CW 399 - Special Studies


    1 to 18 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CW 400 - Capstone I


    2 credits
    Preparation of an independent senior project in Creative Writing.  Students assemble a bibliography of contextual and/or critical works and write a prospectus for a project that will be completed in CW 401 (typically a completed short story or a chapbook manuscript of poetry).
  
  •  

    CW 401 - Capstone II


    2 credits
    Senior project in Creative Writing. Each individually designed project integrates knowledge and skills in the discipline. Oral presentation of final project required. Prerequisite(s): CW 400  .
  
  •  

    CW 405 - Writing and Conference


    1 to 12 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CW 407 - Writing Seminar


    1 to 15 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable.
  
  •  

    CW 409 - Practicum


    1 to 16 credits
    Credits to be arranged. Repeatable for a maximum of 16 credits.
  
  •  

    CW 420 - Beyond the Workshop


    2 credits
    Students engage in activities aimed at the refinement and application of creative writing skills developed in workshops. These activities include enhancement of student portfolios, assembly of materials for publication, preparation for vocal readings, exercises in small press publishing, production and promotion of SOU’s literary journal West Wind Review, curatorship and promotion of Emergent Forms: A 21st Century Reading Series, and facilitation of regular student readings/open mic nights and other community-based literary events. Students serve on this independent, student-staffed literary magazine. Duties include selecting, editing, and responding to submitted manuscripts, as well as conducting community events and business relations to further the scope and financial success of the journal. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisite(s): At least two 300-level Creative Writing courses and one 400-level course.
  
  •  

    CW 481 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    4 credits
    Intensive workshop emphasizing the particulars of the short story. Students distribute copies of and read from their work. Each student completes and submits a finished short story by the end of the quarter.  Short story may be used for capstone credit with prior approval of instructor. Prerequisite(s): CW 381 ENG 298 , CW 320  .
 

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